How to Optimize Your Website’s Copy

Updated: Feb 9

This post is for gig contractors looking to work as a content strategist for a website buildout. We will be talking about Hub, Spoke, Clusters and Authority, Optimization and Copy Structure needed Prior to the Prototype stage.


Pretend that you have to create a website without tabs or a menu bar. And pretend you aren’t allowed to use loose anchor links.


If someone was to land on your website and there was no header or footer and no loose links floating around saying things like “back” or “next” or “request a quote” or “call us” or … you get it… How would the reader be able to navigate and move through your site?


If they can’t navigate your site without a menu or loose anchor links, then neither can a human being or a Google bot. Menus and loose anchor links should be the last step in setting up a website because while they may seem helpful, they can actually hurt a UI/UX Designer when it comes time to layout a prototype.


Structure


You will be compiling all of the information into one document and structuring it kind of like an essay.


Title


Header 1 (H1)

H2-H4

Body


Header 1 (H1)

H2-H4

Body


Header 1 (H1)

H2-H4

Body


Header 1 (H1)

H2-H4

Body


And so on...


There is only one title in an essay and that title is the main topic. On a website, the main topic of conversation would be the client’s business name. But on websites, we don’t put the client’s name as every page’s title. We use the H1s as page names and possibly the page’s title tag… but that will be explained later.


What we put under these pages matters a lot. There are SEO best practices that come into play here.


Just like an essay, the subtitles (or H1s) support the Title’s overall message.


Everything we do on a webpage needs to make sense not only to the reader but to Google as well. If you are in the business of supplying concrete to contractors and homeowners and you are always talking about construction supplies, you may be misleading the reader or bot. Sure, you probably offer construction supplies, but unless you are a construction supply store, it should never be the main focus.


Instead, it becomes a supporting topic.


This is where Pilars, Hubs, Spokes, Clusters and Authority terms come into play.


Pillar


A pillar page is a very long page as it’s well over 2000 words and has a lot of sections. A lot of times web developers add anchor menus and tabs so when a viewer clicks on the tab, they are directed to a certain section of that same exact page.


Hub


Hub pages should be created last… and can even be skipped in the prototype stage if a developer is also a UX/UI designer. Hub pages act as a directory page for different pages of the website. They are not long in length–word-wise (unless you have a massive website)–and have plenty of easy to use call-to-action buttons or widgets/sections.


Spoke


The spoke pages are where you will be spending most of your time in this stage. The spoke pages, if viewed visually from a layout perspective, circle around the hub pages like a bicycle.


Hub pages connect to lots of spoke pages because they support the information on the hub page and from there the spokes connect back and forth between and even to each other, should it make sense. A hub page can be the homepage but it doesn’t have to be. The homepage can act as a secondary hub page if you want it to… Homepages can have a lot of drop offs if too many incoming links are going to it for when people view it they drop off not finding what it was they were looking for.


It just depends on what your conversion optimization plan is. Do you want your homepage to be your biggest “directory” or do you want it to act as a welcome landing page? If you wish for some other pages of your site to be your hub pages, and you also want your homepage to be a hub page, then be sure to connect your homepage to all of your other hub pages!


Cluster


Then there are clusters… Clusters are spoke pages that act as its own hub and spoke layout. Sections of a section.


Authority